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KEEP YOUR EYE ON THE TIGER AT THE ROYAL ALBERT HALL

Royal Garden Hotel’s proximity to the Royal Albert Hall is among its major draws, but the iconic venue is not just the host of memorable concerts and performances; it is also home to some intimate display spaces. From 18 September, the Amphi corridor will house the Eye on the Tiger photography exhibition.

This collaboration with Save Wild Tigers will be a world premiere and the biggest exhibition of tiger photography ever seen. More than 30 of the most talented wildlife photographers have contributed to the exhibition, which aims to draw attention to the critically endangered status of this awesome big cat.

There are estimated to be just 3,800 tigers left in the wild, making spotting particularly difficult, let alone photographing them in all their glory. Visitors keen to help the cause can purchase framed photos from the event to adorn their walls, with all proceeds going to tiger conservation projects.

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Among the highlights of the exhibition is a photo of a young tiger contrasted against the green of tall elephant grass by Steve Winter, who specialises in photographing big cats. He has worked for National Geographic for more than 20 years and been named the BBC Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Jami Tarris has a lot of experience capturing shots of endangered species and has submitted an atmospheric photograph of a tiger in a forest after the sun has set. She was shortlisted for the Natural History Museum’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year People’s Choice Award earlier this year (2018).

In 2010, Andy Rouse published a book on tigers to mark the International Year of the Tiger, making him an obvious choice to be included in the display. His picture of two of the big cats on their hind legs and paws up in a fighting stance shows off their muscular form and unique markings like no other.

VIEWING TIMES

If you are attending a performance at the Royal Albert Hall between 18 September and 14 October, you will be able to go and view the photographs in the Amphi corridor at the same time. Otherwise, it is worth organising a visit between 10am and 4pm on one of the following dates:

  • 22nd September
  • 23rd September
  • 5 October
  • 7 October
  • 12 October
  • 13 October

SAVE WILD TIGERS

The driving force behind Save Wild Tigers is that in ten years’ time, the cause could have gone one of two ways – tiger numbers in the wild could have doubled, or they could have become extinct forever. To help ensure that it is the former and not the latter, the organisation works to protect wild tiger habitat from destruction and reduce the demand for tiger skins and other parts.

Save Wild Tigers works with a number of conservation and non-conservation partners to achieve its aims. Raising awareness of the issues surrounding the survival of the wild tiger across the world is a big part of its mission.

Photo credit: Freder via iStock

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